HIV Transmission When Helping Patients Give Birth?

Illustration of HIV Transmission When Helping Patients Give Birth?
Illustration: HIV Transmission When Helping Patients Give Birth? cdn.hiv.uw.edu

Good night, I am one of the midwives who just a few days ready to help childbirth but a little splash of blood into my eyes, after 2 hours post partum suddenly the patient shivered in shock and then referred after smithin the hospital found out the patient we helped HIV so how is the solution … and what is the medicine for early prevention?

1 Answer:

Greetings HealthReplies.com,
Thank you for asking on HealthReplies.com.
The history of blood contact that you experience while carrying out your duties as a midwife in providing labor assistance, is a form of post exposure with blood or body fluids of patients with HIV positive. If when you provide childbirth assistance with blood splashes and this splash enters the eye or comes in contact with the mucosa of your eye organ, then this post exposure contact is a significant contact to the risk of HIV transmission from patients with HiV positive. The risk of transmission is increased especially if healthy people have contact with blood, bodily fluids containing blood, semen, vaginal fluid, or breast milk for HIV patients; incoming or non-intact contact on the surface of the body. mucosa, eye, vagina or anus especially with HIV positive patients.
In general, to prevent the risk of infection or exposure to contaminated body fluids or blood, especially from patients with HIV, it is best for health workers to protect themselves with predetermined technical procedures. Therefore, adhering to the provisions relating to job security as health workers and patient safety is the first step that must be taken to be able to provide safe and good health services. One of the things we can do is to use gloves, masks, protective goggles, and other personal protective equipment during services that are at risk or according to established standard procedures.
Even if the patient is currently splashing blood with a positive HIv contact with your eyes, especially if blood enters your eyeball, the risk of transmission of HIV infection can be around 0.09%, and the next steps you can take are:
1. Rinse your eyes with running water
2. Visit a local doctor or intern doctor at the hospital you work for or at the nearest government hospital
3. administration of PEP or post exposure prophylaxis. Namely the provision of antiviral HIV to prevent the risk of HIV infection to develop further. PEP is given within the first 72 hours after contact is at risk, and is given for 28 days with 2-3 PEP drugs
4. conduct a supporting laboratory examination for HIV detection and can be repeated after 3 months from the risk of exposure
Thus, you should consider to immediately consult with your obstetrician or doctor of internal medicine to get the right treatment for you. Your doctor will plan preventive measures and treatments that are appropriate for you. so, at this time I cannot provide treatment information or PEP for you, but all this can be given by the doctor who treats you further.
Thus the info we can convey.
thanks.

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